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Duke of Westminster’s wedding: Olivia Henson and that wedding dress that goes away with the wind

When Olivia Henson, in anticipation of the her wedding to the Duke of Westminsterentered the atelier of Emma Victoria Payne asking for a dress with a clean and essential line, she certainly hadn’t imagined that on her wedding day she would find herself fighting against the wind. The weather was the unexpected event you don’t expect at the entrance to the Chester Cathedral an “accessory” that gave the outfit an unexpected volume, also sparking the jubilation of the crowd, and which revealed details that would otherwise have remained hidden from the eyes of most.

Hugh Grosvenor and Olivia Henson on their wedding day struggling with the wind that shakes their train and veil.

Dave Benett/Getty Images

Vaporous despite herself, the ivory-colored dress made of silk crêpe satin and silk organza reflects the personality of the new duchess who seems to loveunderstatement. The silhouette, broken up by a small belt, caresses the body, opening into a train “just” two meters long.

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Some commentators have highlighted how this sartorial choice was seen as a symbol of modesty with respect to the scale of the event and the space to be filled in a cathedral. After all, this wedding it is not royal although it is considered the wedding of the year.

Groom, Hugh Grosvenor called “Hughie”, he is the richest person under 40 in the UKwith assets estimated by Sunday Times of over £10 billion generated by the family business which places him 14th overall.

The newlyweds Hugh Grosvenor and Olivia Henson leaving the cathedral.

The newlyweds Hugh Grosvenor and Olivia Henson leaving the cathedral.

Dave Benett/Getty Images

Also Olivia Henson has aristocratic origins. Born in 1992, she has the blue blood of the Marquess of Bristol and the Duke of Rutland running through her veins. To underline a personal family history there is the veil created for the occasion based on an ancient design which recalls the embroidery of the veil of the bride’s great-great-grandmother dating back to around 1880 to which are added the initials of the couple and the date of marriage.

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Duke of Westminster’s wedding: which tiara will bride Olivia Henson wear

The wedding which will be celebrated in Chester on 7 June will also be a fashion event. If it is difficult to make predictions on the dress that the bride will wear, we can instead venture some hypotheses on the tiara that the aristocrat could wear at the social event of the year

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The floral and vegetal motif, rethought and hand-drawn by herself Emma Victoria Paynealso characterizes the dress: it is echoed in the sleeves, cuffs and rather modest scalloped neckline.

The real flash of the ensemble is found behind where a porthole shows a generous portion of the back but also the shoes, called to represent the something blue necessary for the outfit, arouse a shiver with contrasting effects.

Olivia Henson arriving at Chester Cathedral with the wind lifting her veil and showing her back.

Olivia Henson arriving at Chester Cathedral with the wind lifting her veil and showing her back.

Chris Jackson/Getty Images

As for the tiara, the bet was not difficult to win. Olivia Henson enters the Grosvenor dynasty, embracing what becomes, in effect, a family tradition. In fact, she shows off the Myrtle Wreath Tiaraone of the most significant pieces from the Duke of Westminster’s collection, created in 1906 by the maison Fabergé of St. Petersburg, thinking of Aphrodite, the goddess of love.

Olivia Henson wears the family tiara and veil whose embroidery recalls that of her ancestor.

Olivia Henson wears the family tiara and veil whose embroidery recalls that of her ancestor.

OLI SCARFF/Getty Images

The diamond tiara is designed as if it were a crown of myrtle leaves, a plant considered auspicious for a bride. She was the first to wear the tiara Lady Mabel Florence Crichton for his wedding with Hugh Grosvenor, son of the 1st Duke of Westminster who was joined, among others, in more recent times Lady Tamara Grosvenorsister of Hughie, and Edward Van Cutsem, celebrated in the same cathedral in Chester in 2004.

Olivia Henson and Hugh Grosvenor greet the crowd, their blue shoes can be seen from under their dress.

Olivia Henson and Hugh Grosvenor greet the crowd: their blue shoes can be seen from under their dress.

Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Among those present, the prize for the most elegant certainly goes to the groom’s mother. Natalia Grosvenor she opted for a fuchsia look to mark her transition from duchess, a title that now passes to her daughter-in-law, to Dowager Duchess (the previous Duke of Westminster, Gerald, passed away in 2016). Bright colors and flowers also for Hugh’s sisters, Edwina, Tamara and Viola.

The groom's mother Natalia Grosvenor.

The groom’s mother, Natalia Grosvenor.

Mark Cuthbert/Getty Images

Elegant too Eugenie of York. The princess, a friend since Olivia Henson’s school days, showed up wearing an olive green dress by Joseph with an asymmetrical line and a pleated skirt. She also refined her choice of pearl-colored hat, combined with a clutch and pumps. The veil alone enhances the entire outfit, which is also affected by the wind.

Princess Eugenie of York in the olive green dress by Joseph.

Princess Eugenie of York in the olive green dress by Joseph.

Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Lady Edwina Grosvenor in pink and her husband Dan Snow.

Lady Edwina Grosvenor in pink and her husband Dan Snow.

Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Source: Vanity Fair

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