Martina: “I hope that the girls can dream and choose to be footballers”

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To the most classic and stereotyped of questions, Martina Scurattitwenty years old, has practically always had an answer: the soccer player. So far she has never been able to say that it would be his job, from July, with the arrival of the professionalism in Italian women’s football, her dream is a little closer to reality.

Martina is one of the protagonists of the project Rigor against stereotypes from Euronics, a leading Italian group in the distribution of household appliances and electronics. The campaign aims to support overcoming the gender gap in sport. According to the latest Censis surveys, female inclusion in sport in Italy is not a reality. Especially in football where just 2% of the members are women.

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“Euronics international has embraced the cause of women’s sport to give it greater visibility (also with the sponsorships of the UEFA Women’s Champions League and Women’s EURO 2022 and 2025),” she explains. Daniela Ghidoli Chief Marketing Officer of Euronics Italia, «Italy has decided not to carry out a canonical sponsorship, but to put the players at the center. We want to work on women’s football by letting girls tell the everyday life of stereotypes that he had to face. The criticality is often given, but it is not felt. With their point of view you really feel reality. We work so that the world always takes a step forward ».

Martina is one of the athletes of different age and football experience chosen as the protagonists of this project. «I was born into an Inter family. My father passed on this passion to me. I was four or five when I first asked to play football. First they let me try other sports, swimming, judo and all possible sports, but there was nothing to do. When I was 8 I started playing in a women’s team. I immediately found myself in my worldit was what I always wanted to do ».

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He started in Monza, he played in the Under 15 representative. Inter called him (he didn’t think about it for a moment) and now he plays in the Pro Sesto. “I’ve always had the support of the whole family. My father in particular. No one has ever hindered me, on the contrary I have made everyone even more passionate ».

The most classic of phrases, “How strange a girl who plays football!”, he still hears it now. She never took it. «I have always experienced situations that may appear uncomfortable for others as a challenge. When we played with boys when we were little, it was nice to win because they thought they were superior. Even from the stands the parents said: “Come on, they’re girls”. The face changed at the end of the game ».

She graduated last year, chose to stay for a year and will start studying Cultural Heritage at the University. «Now we need to put together a working life with football, training, matches and away matches. We have no protection at work and economic level, contributions and maternity. With professionalism we will finally be able to work as footballers, like men. Assuming that I find that men’s salaries are exaggerated, certainly there is still a long way to go to the same salary. It would be enough to be able to concentrate all the energies on football, on our work having a more serious, organized and competent world around. I hope for the girls who are now starting to play that they can really do it as a job ».

Other stories of Vanity Fair that may interest you:

– World Cup without Italy, who to cheer for?

– Ada Hegerberg, striker from the future: “My goals, for the players of tomorrow”

Source: Vanity Fair

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