Christmas in the middle of a coronavirus again: How the planet will celebrate – Who will not be affected by the restrictive measures

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For another year Christmas overshadowed by the pandemic and this year mainly by the Omicron mutation, which brings more restrictive measures.

For the second year in a row, the outbreak of the new coronavirus puts ice on the festive plans, from Sydney to Seville.

In Bethlehem, the birthplace of Jesus, according to Christian tradition, the hotel sector, which was expecting an influx of tourists, shows its frustration. After an almost total quarantine last year, Israel closed its borders again. As in 2020, the service, which takes place at midnight, will be able to attend a small circle of believers, only by invitation.

The traditional Christmas procession under the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem Pierbatista Pitsabala is expected to attract more people than last year thanks to more flexible restrictive measures.

In the Vatican, Pope Francis will perform the traditional Christmas service at 19:30 local time (20:30 Greek time) at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. On Christmas day, the traditional blessing Urbi et Orbi (to the city and the universe) of the Argentine pope in St. Peter’s Square is expected.

The Broadway Christmas show has been canceled

In other parts of the world, although the Netherlands is in a lockdown, the Broadway canceled the Christmas shows and the Spain reintroduced the mandatory use of a mask outdoors, it is expected that gatherings will generally be easier than last year.

Millions Americans are preparing to travel to their country, despite its wave Omicron mutation already surpasses that of the Delta variant at its peak and hospitals are experiencing shortages in beds.

The journey, however, may prove complicated for some of them, as United Airlines, one of the main US airlines, announced the cancellation of 120 flights as its available staff shrinks due to the outbreak of the new coronavirus pandemic.

Vaccine, the best gift

The majority of Australians may travel home again, for the first time since the pandemic broke out, which has strengthened the spirit of Christmas in Australia, which is facing a record number of cases.

“We are all witnessing moving scenes of people being at airports again after months away. In such a gloomy time, Christ “, greets the Catholic Archbishop of Sydney Anthony Fisher in his message for Christmas.

At the same time for its prime minister Of Britain Boris Johnson, a vaccination certificate would be the best gift under the Christmas tree.

“Although the time for buying gifts is theoretically running out, there is still one amazing thing you can offer your family and the whole country, and that is to make this installment, whether it is your first, your second. “or for your souvenir, so that next year’s holidays are even better than this year,” he said.

In MoscowIn the midst of tensions with Western countries over Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin has asked Dent Moroz (the Russian version of Santa Claus) to help Russia carry out its plans. “I hope he not only brings us gifts, but also makes the plans of the country and every citizen a reality,” said the Russian president.

Only Santa Claus is lucky

Following the hopes for freedom brought about by the COVID-19 vaccines, the appearance of the highly contagious strain Omicron cast its shadow over the festive atmosphere in households. However, border closures and restrictive measures will not stand in the way of a famous sleigh pulled by reindeer to cross the globe, as Canadian airspace will be open to it, after the presentation of a vaccination certificate and a negative test for the new coronavirus, reports the APE-MPE, citing AFP.

This assurance was given by the Ottawa Minister of Transport, giving the green light to his crew, even to Rudolph, “whose nose may have shone brightly, (but) it was confirmed that he had no symptoms of COVID-19 before leaving”.

The same is true in Australia. «Air traffic controllers will guide Santa Claus with every security in Australian airspace, using its tracking technology twice a second. He is allowed to fly at 500 feet (152.4 meters) so that he can reach the rooftops and deliver his gifts quickly and secretly. “After all, his magic sleigh is not an ordinary plane,” said the Aviation Safety Authority.

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