Macron elects female prime minister – Who is Elizabeth Bourne?

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It took 22 days for French President Emanuel Macron, after his re-election, to announce the name of the new prime minister, just yesterday. Those French people who had heeded Macron’s promise of a “new era” and “new methods” and waited for the president to surprise them felt their first disappointment: “One of the same” they whispered, as the Liberation newspaper headlined.

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It is now up to the Prime Minister herself to be surprised and, admittedly, Elizabeth Bourne has a lot of supplies, both because of her studies at a French university and through her diverse experience in the state machine. Rarely has a prime minister had the experience and training of Elizabeth Bourne.

Talent of a technocrat and less of a politician

She began her career in 1987, being an Education Advisor to Lionel Jospin and later to Jacques Lang (1990). In 2008 he took over the town planning department at the Paris City Hall, in 2013 he was appointed prefect of the Poitou-Charentes region, where Segolene Royal was also a statesman. From 2014-2015, when Royal was Minister of Ecology, Elizabeth Bourne took over the management of her political office.

The new prime minister is considered to be close to the Socialist Party, although she has never had a party booklet. Following the 2017 election, Elizabeth Bourne joined the first Macron government under Prime Minister Edouard Philippe. During the five years he “ran” three large ministries, giving the present whenever there was a need. He served as Minister of Transport (2017), Minister of Ecological Transition (2019) and Minister of Labor (2020). Its assets include the major reform of the French Railways (RATP).

The project to be completed is gigantic

Thirty years after Edith Cresson, who was the first woman prime minister in France, Elizabeth Bourne took over yesterday, with a huge task ahead of her. It will first have to form its new government, but given that there may be changes that could be imposed by the outcome of the June parliamentary elections (12-19). The prime minister herself will be a candidate for the first time in her hometown of Calvados, in northwestern France.

At the same time, with some first steps, he must find a way to calm down the “anger of the people” that lurks. Take action on the purchasing power of the people and this is the first test of whether the French will take to the streets en masse. Take action for schools and education, where whining has peaked, but also for hospitals. To take measures for the climate and ecology, but also for the scientific development of France at international level.

Olympia Tsipira, Paris

Source: Deutsche Welle

Source: Capital

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